This past month, on October 7th, Netflix released Season 2 Part 2 of their original TV series The Ranch. The show features Ashton Kutcher and Danny Masterson who both starred in the cult comedy classic That 70s Show which first aired back in 1998.

The storyline focuses on Colt (Kutcher) a struggling semi-pro football player who just moved back home to Colorado and his brother Rooster (Masterson) as they work on their family ranch. The pair share leading roles as well as acting as executiv

e producers on the show as well alongside Don Reo and Jim Patterson.

The show also

stars Debra Winger, Sam Elliott, Elisha Cuthbert and Kathy Baker to accent the star duo, they even brought in Wilmer Velderrama, who also starred in That 70s Show. Another former cast member is Bret Harrison who plays Kenny, who is dating and then engaged to Colt’s high school crush.

What is nice about the show is that it is certainly original, I would never have thought an entertaining, funny, and witty TV series would be about a ranch. The comedy pairing of Kutcher and Masterson make great TV while their father Beau provides the very sarcastic and hard father figure that plays off well of the immature kids.

cast

There also the love interest Elisha Cuthbert who plays Abby, the free willed former girlfriend of Colt Bennet. Much of the first few episodes contain awkward exchanges and subtle flirting between the two which really exudes the feeling of former partners. However, she is now seeing Kenny, mentioned earlier, and eventually the two become engaged which adds ever more fire to the flame with Colt.

The script is full of cursing and jokes made at the others expense, which is great at times but can eventually become too much swearing and too little of a plot or storyline. While every episode has its own little drama, like any other TV show, there is always an overlying and huge problem the characters must solve. In this show, it is all about saving the ranch from the big bad corporate businesses that want to run out the family owned ranches.

This problem is evident over the first two parts of the TV series and seems like that trend will continue. The drama is certainly packed tight so far as viewers have had to watch he cast overcome breakups, divorce, inter-family squabbles, and a winter so fierce they almost sold the ranch themselves.

Overall, the show is enjoyable and definitely worth a shot from viewers who like a quality laugh and easy to watch show. However, I am not sure how long the show can continue unless they add a few more twists and turns to the plot. Eventually viewers will get bored of the same sob story on how to save the ranch, and how many times can Colt and Abby fight and make up.

I would rate The Ranch a 7.5 out of 10, and would highly recommend to all of my friends between the ages of 17 to 24. While I believe many people younger and older may still enjoy the show, it is definitely tailored to appeal to predetermined age group.

Here is a trailer for the latest season of The Ranch: